Foxcatcher | Movie Review 30 Jan 2015   266


foxcatcher-review

Cast: Steve Carell, Channing Tatum, Mark Ruffalo, Sienna Miller, Vanessa Redgrave
Direction: Bennett Miller
Genre: Drama
Duration: 2 hours 14 minutes

Critics Review

Times of India (TOI):

Mark (Tatum) and John reside at either end of the wealth spectrum. Mark has a wrestling gold from the 1984 Olympics and John, scion of the enormously loaded du Pont family, has a sense of hollow self-importance that sounds almost ridiculous if it weren’t laced with a fairly apparent feeling that he is rather odd fellow with creepy mannerisms.
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Mid-Day:

John DuPont was a crazy man. He was rich, and he was obsessive and he was also a deeply disturbed (and also disturbing) personality. Brought up on a huge estate of the famous DuPont family, he had been doing crazy things all his life, until he reached the crescendo and was hauled to prison in the mid 90’s. ‘Foxcatcher’ attempts to cover the events preceding his arrest.
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NDTV Movies:

While the word Foxcatcher conjures up images of a person hunting foxes, the title is used as an apt metaphor. It is the name of the team that assimilated talented wrestlers. Based on a real life incident that occurred between the mid-1980s to January 1996 in America, it gives a contemplative insight into a psychotic’s murder drama that pivots on a revenge angle.
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The Indian Express:

Bennett Miller’s third film based on a true story, after Capote and Moneyball, is his most chilling, particularly in how it slowly builds sense of dread around a serene, isolated estate, a few closeted men, and a little-understood sport celebrating raw, controlled aggression.
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Rediff:

Foxcatcher is deathly dull and far too graceless, says Raja Sen. Foxcatcher is a film born out of a fascinating (but hard to believe) memoir, a story about sport and commitment and opportunities and madness. It is a tale that could well have been adapted with a riveting flourish, but Bennett Miller’s film creaks under the weight of its own laboriousness.
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